Hypothyroid and Weight Loss

Hypothyroid and Weight Loss

Make it Watercress Juice!

An ancient green, watercress is said to have been a staple in the diet of Roman soldiers, which they used for energy and brain power. It is a part of the cruciferous vegetable family along with kale, broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts.

Hippocrates, the father of medicine, used watercress to treat his patients. It was widely available until the 19th century and watercress sandwiches were a staple of the working class in England.

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Heal Your Thyroid Gland

Heal Your Thyroid Gland

Heal Your Thyroid Gland

The thyroid gland needs specific vitamins and minerals to function well. Research shows us that there are several key nutrients that are highly valuable for the thyroid gland.

Iodine is the most important trace element found in thyroid functioning. Without iodine, our thyroid does not have the basic building blocks it needs to make the necessary hormones to support all of the tissues in the body. Thyroxine (T4) and Triiodothyronine (T3) are the most essential, active, iodine-containing hormones in our body. In 2012, a CDC report showed that women of childbearing years in the United States, ages 20-39, had the lowest iodine levels of any other age group. This is something we can easily improve by eating more iodine-rich foods such as seaweed and sea vegetables. (See the Veggie Seaweed Wrap Recipe below,)

Selenium is vital to our thyroid in several ways. Selenium-containing enzymes protect the thyroid gland when we are under stress, working to flush out oxidative and chemical stress, and even social stress – which can cause reactions in our body. Selenium-based proteins help regulate hormone synthesis, converting T4 into the more accessible T3. These proteins and enzymes help regulate metabolism and also help maintain the right amount of thyroid hormones in the tissues and blood, as well as organs such as the liver, kidneys, and even the brain. Selenium also helps regulate and recycle our iodine stores.

Zinc, iron, and copper are trace metals that are vital to thyroid function. Low levels of zinc can cause T4, T3, and the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to drop too low. Research shows that both hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) and hypothyroidism (under active thyroid), can sometimes create a zinc deficiency leading to lower thyroid hormones. Decreased levels of iron can result in decreased thyroid function as well. When combined with an iodine deficiency, iron must be replaced to repair the thyroid imbalance. Copper is needed to help produce TSH, and maintain T4 production. T4 helps cholesterol regulation, and some research even indicates copper deficiency may contribute to higher cholesterol levels and heart issues for people with hypothyroidism.

 

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Thyroid and Osteopenia/Osteoporosis

Thyroid and Osteopenia/Osteoporosis

Thyroid and Osteopenia/Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis, osteopenia, or bone loss can be caused by thyroid levels (T3 and T4) that are too high or too low. High thyroid levels up-regulate the genes involved with bone resorption or bone loss.  But thyroid hormone also up-regulates the genes involved with bone formation and bone generation. If thyroid levels are too low, bone generation is impaired. Healthy bone metabolism requires thyroid levels that are neither too high nor low.

Research has shown that thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) has a dual function: Osteoblasts actually have TSH receptors that are constantly “listening” for signals from TSH. T3 sets the bone building tempo. It needs to be consistent and regular to produce harmonic results, and it involves many key players. For instance, osteoblasts actually play an important role in mediating the thyroid hormone stimulation of osteoclastic resorption, according to a study published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. This means that osteoblasts act as mediators between thyroid hormone and osteoclasts (the cells that tear down bone).

Without sufficient T3, normal bone remodeling is disrupted, and bone resorption happens at a more rapid rate than bone building. The result is decreased bone density and osteopenia  or osteoporosis.

Other Related Conditions Associated with Thyroid Disorder

  • Adrenal Fatigue (see The Juice Lady’s Remedies for Stress and Adrenal Fatigue)
  • Anemia
  • Hyponatremia (low blood sodium)
  • Lack of coordination
  • Clumsiness
  • Tendency to fall
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting episodes
  • Vertigo
  • Tremor
  • Growth disturbances in children
  • Chronic allergies
  • Chemical sensitivities
  • Restless Leg Syndrome
  • Rhabdomyolysis (destruction of skeletal muscle)
  • Scoliosis
  • Hernia

For the sake of your bones, it is very important to feed your thyroid and support the health of this gland.  Nutrients that empower the thyroid are very important to include when you are under stress as well as when you have symptoms of low thyroid. (Take the Thyroid Quiz)  Iodine is necessary for formation of T4, while L-tyrosine is a necessary component of both T4 and T3 formation. Animal studies indicate the botanical ashwagandha can increase T4 concentrations. Several nutrients are also necessary for conversion of T4 to T3, including the minerals selenium, zinc, and copper. An insufficiency of vitamin B 12 appears to interfere with the activity of thyroid hormones. Conversion of T4 to T3 can be inhibited by heavy metal toxicity and lipid peroxidation; the antioxidant vitamins C and E can counterbalance this inhibition.

 

For more information and remedies for thyroid health, get my book  The Juice Lady’s Remedies for Thyroid Disorder.

On special now for just $9.00.

 

 

Thyrocsin™

(contains all the nutrients noted above) $27.35

 

 

Today’s special offer Thyroid Book + Supplement Special offer Thyroid Renew-

the book and the supplement – $35.95

 

 

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